A Pilgrim’s Prayer

DSCN1504

Mount Neelkantha in the Himalayan Range

Burnt orange is slowly changing into a dazzling white while I remain hidden mesmerized in the dark shade that the Himalayas offer me. Tourists abound here, clicking and letting out soft sound of wonderment. I am not a tourist now. I am a pilgrim. The Indians, the Hindus mainly have tendencies to build temples and worship in such lofty places and pilgrims flow like the Ganges or the Alakananda towards them.

 

Before visiting the temple I also let out my soft prayer to the Almighty to let the mountain survive, thrive with the flora and fauna that it used to have those days when pilgrims trudged miles after miles without the least care for their comfort, risking their life and were blessed by the generosity of the Himalayas for you don’t know when suddenly a pristine fountain would pop up and quench your thirst and fruit laden trees would feed you so that your dry food stock would not exhaust fast. I also prayed that it might be saved from unscrupulous visitors making it a perfect litter bin. But who is listening?

 

A yellow beaked crow

Takes lone flight to winter sky

Like a pilgrim’s sigh

 

River Alaknanda flowing side by side

River Alakananda

 

Posted for Haibun Monday – Free For All @ dVerse hosted by Hayesspencer

 

&

 

Shared with Poetry Pantry @ Poets United

Advertisements

30 thoughts on “A Pilgrim’s Prayer

  1. I liked the phrase: “pilgrims flow like the Ganges or the Alakananda towards them.” Those rivers would flow away from the mountains and the pilgrims flow back up. Tourists are a primitive sort of pilgrim. They don’t see the significance of what they are doing. And they leave their litter around. Nice observation about getting water and food spontaneously like a gift along the way to preserve one’s supply. I normally don’t think about such gifts when I walk, but someone on a deeper pilgrimage would be grateful for such help. It made me think that a pilgrimage is a two way conversation. It’s not only the pilgrim’s activity that counts. Nice haibun about pilgrimage.

  2. I did so enjoy this…the holiness and respect, the giving of sustenance by the mountain. And the beyond beautiful haiku….we are listening to this plea. The pics are incredible.

  3. I have a temple story from the Republic of South Korea… Buddhist, I guess… but I don’t speak Hangul. Maybe I’ll share that someday in verse. Your Haibun is poignant in that it expresses the sadness caused by unmindful interlopers, and the wonder if anyone is listening. Picture perfect haiku!

  4. Both photos are so beautiful, matching the beauty of your reflective words. May your prayers be answered! The haiku is gorgeous, managing to encompass all the moods of your prose piece in those three brief lines.

  5. First of all, what beautiful photos, Sumana. It would be a perfect world if everyone who visited such places went as a pilgrim rather than a tourist. I definitely hope this place is saved from unscrupulous visitors so that pilgrims can continue to appreciate it for decades and centuries to come.

  6. My goodness this is soo beautiful, Sumana!❤️ Especially love; “Before visiting the temple I also let out my soft prayer to the Almighty to let the mountain survive, thrive with the flora and fauna that it used to have those days when pilgrims trudged miles after miles without the least care for their comfort, risking their life and were blessed by the generosity of the Himalayas for you don’t know when suddenly a pristine fountain would pop up and quench your thirst and fruit laden trees would feed you so that your dry food stock would not exhaust fast” .. sigh.. Indeed may it thrive!❤️

  7. Sadly sightseers leave an unsightly footprint wherever they go. It is all part of the ugliness of mankind measured normally by how wealthy they are so they are then more care less.

  8. Tourist dollars are irresistible to everyone and everywhere tourists go places are destroyed.Sad.Beautiful pics…you are blessed to be visiting there again.

Thank You :)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s